Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V (early)

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Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early

Built May 2005 to November 2005

Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early

 

1.     This Model was donated to me by my next-door-neighbour Steve Fletcher. Steve also donated last year's Eduard P-40 under similar circumstances - he had some problems with it and had lost interest in completing it. This Photo was taken in late May 2005.

Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early
Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Cockpit assembly Rebuilt the cockpit and assembled the wings Cockpit inside the fuselage
2.     The Eduard 1/48th Scale Hawker Tempest Mk V (early version). The 'early version' refers to the longer Cannon Barrels in the wings (left). 3.     By early June I had stripped of all the paint that had originally been applied and 'un-assembled' all of Steve's original work to bring the kit back to pristine status 4.     After reversing all of the original construction I painstakingly started from scratch and rebuilt the cockpit and assembled the wings. 5.     Although the instructions show the cockpit tub being assembled separately this makes painting difficult. Instead it is always better to fix all sections of the cockpit inside the fuselage in such a way that it make painting easier.
The seat after the paint & superglue had been stripped away Bulk heads were assembled in situ Use scrap plastic in the joints Exhaust pipes were drilled out
6.     Here we see the seat after the paint & superglue had been stripped away. This had been assembled incorrectly by its previous owner so was re-assembled as shown here. 7.     These photo's give a bit more detail of how the cockpit sides and bulk heads were assembled in situ. You need to tape the fuselage sides together temporarily then secure everything with BluTak. 8.     When everything is temporarily fixed then simply superglue all the resin components in place. The BluTak is obviously not strong so use scrap plastic in the joints (right). 9.     The exhaust pipes were drilled out for realism. You can buy better exhausts from Moskit but I was trying to build this ProfiPack 'straight from the box'!
General scene of chaos Interior grey and black Black cockpit areas are masked off Black cockpit areas are masked off
10.     The general scene of chaos, around early June 2005, on the Modelling Workbench. After cockpit, wing, propeller, exhaust, radiator and tail assembly. Then I took a few weeks to clear the Attic out... 11.     This photo was taken at the end of July 2005. The only progress this month was the airbrushing of the interior grey and black. 12.     The next sequence of photo's are taken in September 2005. The black cockpit areas are masked off so that the green can be air-brushed on. 13.     ...and the same for the other side. Note I have masked off the Radiator area to prevent any accidental overspray ruining the finish in these areas.
Hand painting with a fine brush The radiator assembly and photo-etch grill The cockpit floor and undercarriage wheel wells This bay is finished
14.     After the masking came off, and some hand painting with a fine brush, this is the finished cockpit detail. A little dry-brushing picks out the details. 15.     The radiator assembly and photo-etch grill after they were airbrushed Humbrol Metalcote Gunmetal. This polishes to a great metallic finish. 16.     The cockpit floor and undercarriage wheel wells shortly after airbrushing interior green. 17.     After a wash of black acrylic (heavily thinned and with a drop of acrylic gloss) and some paint chips, & this bay is finished.
The rest of the cockpit The undercarriage doors The undercarriage doors Major assembly
18.     A similar acrylic black wash treatment to the rest of the cockpit yields good results. 19.     The undercarriage doors after having been airbrushed green ..... 20.     ...and after they have been 'washed' (with the same recipe black acrylic) and weathered. They just come alive don't they? 21.     With the inside finished it's time for major assembly. First the fuselage (which fitted together very well)...
Major assembly Major assembly Preshading has been done Temporary wooden under-cart
22.     ...and then the wings & tail to the fuselage. Note the very poor fit at the wing/horizontal tail roots requiring much filler. I tried for a while to cut away the cockpit floor to make this fit better but the problem appears to be with the fuselage side mouldings. 23.     Pictured in early October 2005. All those awful joints have been filled and smoothed off. Some black paints was added to highlight any problems before finishing off. In this photo the undercarriage has temporarily been installed so that the retraction arms, on the main gear, can be glued to the legs in the correct position. The scalpel holds everything in place. 24.     A few weeks later at the end of October all those evenings in are starting to pay off. By now the grey undercoat is on and the preshading has been done. The RAF Sky band on the rear fuselage has been air-brushed on as have the wing-leading-edge yellow strips. The kit is now mounted on a temporary toothpick "undercarriage"........... 25.     Turn the Tempest upside-down and we see that the white areas for the Invasion stripes have been added. All these coloured areas will be carefully masked off ready for the application of the final camouflage scheme. This views show very well the temporary wooden under-cart which comes in very handy for handling the kit during air-brushing.
Close-up of the cockpit with its toothpick strut View of the painted model Tempest is complete The Tempest is complete
26.     By early November the camouflage colours have been airbrushed on using Xtracrylics. Here we see a close-up of the cockpit with its toothpick strut that supports the model when upturned for painting. 27.     Here we see an overall view of the painted model as a comparison to the next photo taken after application of decals, weathering and finishing. 28.     By the middle of November 2005 the Tempest is complete. As a divergence from normal practices this model had its panel lines airbrushed with Xtracolour Tyre Black. The experiment was not entirely successful. 29.     Despite the imperfection the finished paint job looks pretty good. The original priming undercoat did not go on very well and had to be cut back with Micromesh to make it smooth.
Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early
30.     In this area of the tail we see how the post-shading of the panel lines doesn't work too well. The airbrush line should have been narrower and the colour lighter. Better still the post shade colour should not have been black. 31.     A close-up of the sharp end of the Tempest showing off the beautiful detail in the radiator. This item is the photo-etch item shown earlier. 32.     The Eduard details add realism to the cockpit - such as these seatbelts. 33.     The canopy is from Falcon Clearvax but it was considerably larger than the kit's and may have been over-sized.....
Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early
34.     Another peek at that cockpit from above. 35.      This photo does its best to show those fantastic details that are so difficult to see. 36.     The other side of the tail showing a slightly more subtle application of the post-shade. In future it is best if the post shade colour is a much darker version of the base colour. Then the panels should be in filled with a lighter version of the base colour. 37.     Even so the effect is not too bad with the dark grey used here for post shading. The wing areas look very good. The panel lines have been initially picked out with a wash of black oil paint thinned with white spirit.
Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early
38.     The post-shading with dark grey is most effective on the underside where it is dark grey over light grey. 39.     A close up of the underside of the wings shows the beautiful realism of the weathering. 40.     ...and the same on the other wing. 41.     The underside of the tail also came out well.
Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early
42.     A little Xtracolour Exhaust has been applied to the Cannons and links chutes 43.     The undercarriage received only a wire brake line. Apart from this it is straight-out-of-the-box. 44.     The underside looks quite neat. 45.     Nothing wrong here. The finish is a little rough.
Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early
46.     A wider view of the same area. 47.     A final overall shot of the underside. 48.     Photo added September 2006 showing the Tempest on its Base. 49.     Close up of the cockpit area with the flash on to show the interior.
Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early Eduard 1/48th scale Tempest Mk. V early
50.     Side shot of the Tempest on the base. It represents an area of PSP on a very muddy and wet day at Tangmere. 51.     This offers a slightly better view of the mud and puddles. The full story of the making of the Base is in our "Gallery" section here. 52.     Here we see a close up of the PSP. This is actually from a FlightPath photo-etch set. The base is modeller's clay. 53.     And in conclusion.... Eduard's Tempest Mk. V (early)...

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